Contemporary Public Policy: Theoretical Perspectives

Contemporary Public Policy: Theoretical Perspectives

Order Description
Essay: i need 2500 words
number of words 2500
Choose ONE of the following questions:
1. Is the idea of ‘nudging’ in public policy as outlined by Thaler and Sunstein a desirable response to the limits of rational decision making by individuals,
or is it really an insidious form of paternalism?

2. Critically assess the arguments about human development associated with
the capability view addressing, in particular, the implications of capability ideas for public policy.

3. What relevance do ideas of social capital have for contemporary public
policy? In answering this question, address in particular the main policy implications of the different types of social capital – bonding, bridging and linking.

4. Critically assess the theoretical and practical debates about stakeholding, focussing either on the basic income or asset aspects. Address the issues in the context of a particular society of your choice.
5. Examine and assess quality of government principles for public policy reform and practice in a society of your choice.
ESSAY WRITING ADVICE
1. Approach
Basics. Your essay should be typed in a clear 12-point font, double-spaced, and with a wide margin on at least one side for comments. Pages must be numbered. Any divergence from these simple basics will lose marks.
Answer the question. You must answer the question asked, not merely write down some things more or less to do with the broad subject-area. You should therefore read the question very carefully to make sure you know what it’s asking. If the question can be interpreted in more than one way, make it clear what you are taking it to mean. Feel free to ‘attack’ the question, i.e. to point out any ambiguities or questionable assumptions it contains. Announce (in outline) what your answer is going to be straight away, i.e. in your introductory paragraph. This is your thesis statement, and I shall expect every essay to begin in this way. It tells me where you’re supposed to be going, and it helps you to stick to the point. See ‘Structure: Introduction’, below.
Define key terms. The meaning of the key terms in your question – words like ‘liberty’, ‘justice’, ‘equality’, ‘democracy’ – will be controversial. You will need to say what you understand by them, and perhaps set out two or more rival interpretations, in order to answer your question well.
Make a case. Your goal is to give a clear answer to the question, and to back up your answer with persuasive reasons, i.e. to construct a good argument. Try to take a clear stand, don’t fudge. In support of your view, present a sequence of reasons leading to a conclusion, not just a few disconnected considerations.
Balance. Your case should be ‘balanced’. This does not mean that you should sit on the fence. It means that your case should not be merely one-sided, considering only the evidence and arguments in favour of your own point of view, but rather should take into account opposing arguments, both actual and possible. Try to imagine what someone would say who wanted to argue with you. State the opposing view in its best version (not just a straw man), and reply to it. This will strengthen rather than weaken your position: your case will be stronger if you can take on the opposition at its best and still show how your view is better.
Research. You will need to do some research beyond the required readings. But two points. First, to show that you’ve done this it’s not enough just to produce a bibliography; you must integrate the contents of the bibliography into your argument. If a work isn’t really part of your argument, then it hasn’t really contributed to your case and shouldn’t be in the bibliography. Secondly, don’t get carried away with research to the point that your whole essay is a list of other people’s views. Don’t let your research drive your writing; rather, your research should be the servant of your argument, stimulating and illustrating your own ideas.
2. Structure
Introduction. Every essay should have an introductory paragraph, which should make it clear which question you’re answering, and which should contain, I repeat, a concise thesis statement (see above), i.e. a statement of roughly what your answer to the question is going to be, what you’re going to prove. Essays without a thesis statement in the introduction will lose marks.
Development. Demonstrate your thesis in a sequence of distinct steps, signalled by paragraphing. Stick to the point, don’t stray off into matters you might happen to know about, or want to discuss, but which don’t bear on the question, or don’t help you answer it.
Quoting. You should quote and use references to illustrate and back up your own explanations and arguments, not as substitutes for these. If you quote, always explain the meaning and significance of the quote in your own words. Do not quote or refer to lectures – they are informal guides to reading, not scholarly sources. You may cite sources from the internet, but don’t rely on these alone because internet material is extremely uneven in quality.
Conclusion. Reach as clear and strong a conclusion as you can, taking into account the matter of ‘balance’ mentioned above. Don’t just tell me the matter is ‘interesting’ and that people will continue to discuss it.
References and bibliography. You must provide references for your quotations. Your references should be completely accurate (I may follow them up). I don’t mind what system you use, as long as it’s clear and used consistently, but I recommend either the Harvard system or the ‘numerical’ system that is described in the University’s handbook for students, Making the Grade. References to internet or electronic database sources should also take a standard form, which, again, is set out in Making the Grade. All your references should be gathered in a Bibliography at the end of the essay (which should contain only references used in the essay.

3. Miscellaneous
Proofreading. Proofread, proofread, proofread. Spelling, punctuation etc. are graded as well as content. You must check your work for errors of presentation. In addition, it’s a big help to get someone else to read it over, since it’s amazing what you miss on your own.
Breach of academic integrity. Breaches of academic conventions such as passing off other people’s work as your own are serious matters, and will be dealt with strictly according to the University’s ‘Policies and Procedures’ (see Statement of Assessment Methods below). Please see me if you are in doubt about what counts as such a breach.
Word limit. Excludes references and Bibliography

Contemporary Public Policy: Theoretical Perspectives Order Description Essay: i need 2500 words number of words 2500 Choose ONE of the following questions: 1. Is the idea of ‘nudging’ in public policy as outlined by Thaler and Sunstein a desirable response to the limits of rational decision making by individuals, or is it really an insidious form of paternalism? 2. Critically assess the arguments about human development associated with the capability view addressing, in particular, the implications of capability ideas for public policy. 3. What relevance do ideas of social capital have for contemporary public policy? In answering this question, address in particular the main policy implications of the different types of social capital – bonding, bridging and linking. 4. Critically assess the theoretical and practical debates about stakeholding, focussing either on the basic income or asset aspects. Address the issues in the context of a particular society of your choice. 5. Examine and assess quality of government principles for public policy reform and practice in a society of your choice. ESSAY WRITING ADVICE 1. Approach Basics. Your essay should be typed in a clear 12-point font, double-spaced, and with a wide margin on at least one side for comments. Pages must be numbered. Any divergence from these simple basics will lose marks. Answer the question. You must answer the question asked, not merely write down some things more or less to do with the broad subject-area. You should therefore read the question very carefully to make sure you know what it’s asking. If the question can be interpreted in more than one way, make it clear what you are taking it to mean. Feel free to ‘attack’ the question, i.e. to point out any ambiguities or questionable assumptions it contains. Announce (in outline) what your answer is going to be straight away, i.e. in your introductory paragraph. This is your thesis statement, and I shall expect every essay to begin in this way. It tells me where you’re supposed to be going, and it helps you to stick to the point. See ‘Structure: Introduction’, below. Define key terms. The meaning of the key terms in your question – words like ‘liberty’, ‘justice’, ‘equality’, ‘democracy’ – will be controversial. You will need to say what you understand by them, and perhaps set out two or more rival interpretations, in order to answer your question well. Make a case. Your goal is to give a clear answer to the question, and to back up your answer with persuasive reasons, i.e. to construct a good argument. Try to take a clear stand, don’t fudge. In support of your view, present a sequence of reasons leading to a conclusion, not just a few disconnected considerations. Balance. Your case should be ‘balanced’. This does not mean that you should sit on the fence. It means that your case should not be merely one-sided, considering only the evidence and arguments in favour of your own point of view, but rather should take into account opposing arguments, both actual and possible. Try to imagine what someone would say who wanted to argue with you. State the opposing view in its best version (not just a straw man), and reply to it. This will strengthen rather than weaken your position: your case will be stronger if you can take on the opposition at its best and still show how your view is better. Research. You will need to do some research beyond the required readings. But two points. First, to show that you’ve done this it’s not enough just to produce a bibliography; you must integrate the contents of the bibliography into your argument. If a work isn’t really part of your argument, then it hasn’t really contributed to your case and shouldn’t be in the bibliography. Secondly, don’t get carried away with research to the point that your whole essay is a list of other people’s views. Don’t let your research drive your writing; rather, your research should be the servant of your argument, stimulating and illustrating your own ideas. 2. Structure Introduction. Every essay should have an introductory paragraph, which should make it clear which question you’re answering, and which should contain, I repeat, a concise thesis statement (see above), i.e. a statement of roughly what your answer to the question is going to be, what you’re going to prove. Essays without a thesis statement in the introduction will lose marks. Development. Demonstrate your thesis in a sequence of distinct steps, signalled by paragraphing. Stick to the point, don’t stray off into matters you might happen to know about, or want to discuss, but which don’t bear on the question, or don’t help you answer it. Quoting. You should quote and use references to illustrate and back up your own explanations and arguments, not as substitutes for these. If you quote, always explain the meaning and significance of the quote in your own words. Do not quote or refer to lectures – they are informal guides to reading, not scholarly sources. You may cite sources from the internet, but don’t rely on these alone because internet material is extremely uneven in quality. Conclusion. Reach as clear and strong a conclusion as you can, taking into account the matter of ‘balance’ mentioned above. Don’t just tell me the matter is ‘interesting’ and that people will continue to discuss it. References and bibliography. You must provide references for your quotations. Your references should be completely accurate (I may follow them up). I don’t mind what system you use, as long as it’s clear and used consistently, but I recommend either the Harvard system or the ‘numerical’ system that is described in the University’s handbook for students, Making the Grade. References to internet or electronic database sources should also take a standard form, which, again, is set out in Making the Grade. All your references should be gathered in a Bibliography at the end of the essay (which should contain only references used in the essay. 3. Miscellaneous Proofreading. Proofread, proofread, proofread. Spelling, punctuation etc. are graded as well as content. You must check your work for errors of presentation. In addition, it’s a big help to get someone else to read it over, since it’s amazing what you miss on your own. Breach of academic integrity. Breaches of academic conventions such as passing off other people’s work as your own are serious matters, and will be dealt with strictly according to the University’s ‘Policies and Procedures’ (see Statement of Assessment Methods below). Please see me if you are in doubt about what counts as such a breach. Word limit. Excludes references and Bibliography

Contemporary Public Policy: Theoretical Perspectives

Order Description
Essay: i need 2500 words
number of words 2500
Choose ONE of the following questions:
1. Is the idea of ‘nudging’ in public policy as outlined by Thaler and Sunstein a desirable response to the limits of rational decision making by individuals,
or is it really an insidious form of paternalism?

2. Critically assess the arguments about human development associated with
the capability view addressing, in particular, the implications of capability ideas for public policy.

3. What relevance do ideas of social capital have for contemporary public
policy? In answering this question, address in particular the main policy implications of the different types of social capital – bonding, bridging and linking.

4. Critically assess the theoretical and practical debates about stakeholding, focussing either on the basic income or asset aspects. Address the issues in the context of a particular society of your choice.
5. Examine and assess quality of government principles for public policy reform and practice in a society of your choice.
ESSAY WRITING ADVICE
1. Approach
Basics. Your essay should be typed in a clear 12-point font, double-spaced, and with a wide margin on at least one side for comments. Pages must be numbered. Any divergence from these simple basics will lose marks.
Answer the question. You must answer the question asked, not merely write down some things more or less to do with the broad subject-area. You should therefore read the question very carefully to make sure you know what it’s asking. If the question can be interpreted in more than one way, make it clear what you are taking it to mean. Feel free to ‘attack’ the question, i.e. to point out any ambiguities or questionable assumptions it contains. Announce (in outline) what your answer is going to be straight away, i.e. in your introductory paragraph. This is your thesis statement, and I shall expect every essay to begin in this way. It tells me where you’re supposed to be going, and it helps you to stick to the point. See ‘Structure: Introduction’, below.
Define key terms. The meaning of the key terms in your question – words like ‘liberty’, ‘justice’, ‘equality’, ‘democracy’ – will be controversial. You will need to say what you understand by them, and perhaps set out two or more rival interpretations, in order to answer your question well.
Make a case. Your goal is to give a clear answer to the question, and to back up your answer with persuasive reasons, i.e. to construct a good argument. Try to take a clear stand, don’t fudge. In support of your view, present a sequence of reasons leading to a conclusion, not just a few disconnected considerations.
Balance. Your case should be ‘balanced’. This does not mean that you should sit on the fence. It means that your case should not be merely one-sided, considering only the evidence and arguments in favour of your own point of view, but rather should take into account opposing arguments, both actual and possible. Try to imagine what someone would say who wanted to argue with you. State the opposing view in its best version (not just a straw man), and reply to it. This will strengthen rather than weaken your position: your case will be stronger if you can take on the opposition at its best and still show how your view is better.
Research. You will need to do some research beyond the required readings. But two points. First, to show that you’ve done this it’s not enough just to produce a bibliography; you must integrate the contents of the bibliography into your argument. If a work isn’t really part of your argument, then it hasn’t really contributed to your case and shouldn’t be in the bibliography. Secondly, don’t get carried away with research to the point that your whole essay is a list of other people’s views. Don’t let your research drive your writing; rather, your research should be the servant of your argument, stimulating and illustrating your own ideas.
2. Structure
Introduction. Every essay should have an introductory paragraph, which should make it clear which question you’re answering, and which should contain, I repeat, a concise thesis statement (see above), i.e. a statement of roughly what your answer to the question is going to be, what you’re going to prove. Essays without a thesis statement in the introduction will lose marks.
Development. Demonstrate your thesis in a sequence of distinct steps, signalled by paragraphing. Stick to the point, don’t stray off into matters you might happen to know about, or want to discuss, but which don’t bear on the question, or don’t help you answer it.
Quoting. You should quote and use references to illustrate and back up your own explanations and arguments, not as substitutes for these. If you quote, always explain the meaning and significance of the quote in your own words. Do not quote or refer to lectures – they are informal guides to reading, not scholarly sources. You may cite sources from the internet, but don’t rely on these alone because internet material is extremely uneven in quality.
Conclusion. Reach as clear and strong a conclusion as you can, taking into account the matter of ‘balance’ mentioned above. Don’t just tell me the matter is ‘interesting’ and that people will continue to discuss it.
References and bibliography. You must provide references for your quotations. Your references should be completely accurate (I may follow them up). I don’t mind what system you use, as long as it’s clear and used consistently, but I recommend either the Harvard system or the ‘numerical’ system that is described in the University’s handbook for students, Making the Grade. References to internet or electronic database sources should also take a standard form, which, again, is set out in Making the Grade. All your references should be gathered in a Bibliography at the end of the essay (which should contain only references used in the essay.

3. Miscellaneous
Proofreading. Proofread, proofread, proofread. Spelling, punctuation etc. are graded as well as content. You must check your work for errors of presentation. In addition, it’s a big help to get someone else to read it over, since it’s amazing what you miss on your own.
Breach of academic integrity. Breaches of academic conventions such as passing off other people’s work as your own are serious matters, and will be dealt with strictly according to the University’s ‘Policies and Procedures’ (see Statement of Assessment Methods below). Please see me if you are in doubt about what counts as such a breach.
Word limit. Excludes references and Bibliography

Business and Management

Business and Management

Order Description
Question:
Critically explain why oligopoly appears to offer a more dynamic and growth inducing model when compared to the supposed ideal of perfect competition that many economists advocate as being the most efficient market structure.

The Strategic Management Process: Theories, Concepts, Tools and Application

The Strategic Management Process: Theories, Concepts, Tools and Application
Order Description
Topic:The Strategic Management Process: Theories, Concepts, Tools and Application

Question:
Successful general managers are highly competent in problem identification and analysis and have a strong action orientation. One purpose of this unit is to provide an environment that will allow students to hone these skills, while at the same time gain a conceptual understanding of the strategic manager’s task. This assignment has two tasks that require you to demonstrate your knowledge and skills in strategic management.
First, you are required to develop a one page (A4) detailed schematic table or diagram that presents a comprehensive overview of the core theories, concepts and tools used by strategic managers who need to have an in-depth understanding of generic problems in all relevant functional areas of a firm or organisation. These theories, concepts and tools are covered in the power points I upload.

A schematic table is a presentation of the elements of a system or process, in this case the strategic management process. It should be visually powerful, appealing, informative, and presented in a logical order to reflect the overall integrity of the strategic management system or process. You can choose a small font, coloured boxes and different shapes. Acronyms may be used as headings, but each word within the acronym must be shown. At a minimum, your schema should include, but is not limited to:
? External environmental analysis (SMFA & PESTLE)
? Industry analysis (Porter’s 5 forces of competition)
? Resource model (TO + WS)
? Mission, vision, values
? Value chain analysis
? 5 generic business level strategies
? Managing relationships with customers
? Corporate strategy (vertical and horizontal integration, diversification, portfolio analysis)
? Co-operative, Competitive, International & M&A strategies.
? Diamond of national advantage
? Leadership
? Corporate governance
? Structure and controls.

Second, you are required to select three of the above concepts and discuss how a company or organisation of your choosing (other than Temple & Webster) has utilised them to create value. You are limited to 250 words per concept(750 in total) , at least one reference for each.
An example of a partial schema (without content) is given as a guide only.

Strategy of International Business

Strategy of International Business
Order Description
Scenario

You have been appointed as advisor to the Board of Ryanair and have been asked to consider a proposal to expand through an internationalisation programme (based upon its successful “no-frills” positioning strategy/business model) by setting up a new strategic business unit (SBU) in Australia.

You are required to write a report to the Board setting out your recommendations and justifying them.

Your report should include:

• Introduction 10 marks

• Consideration of Porter’s National Double Diamond model (Porter M.E.1990) as adapted by Rugman and D’Cruz (1993,) between Ryanair’s home country (Ireland) and Australia. 20 marks

• An evaluation of the proposal by briefly applying the SAFe Criteria (Suitability, Acceptability and Feasibility criteria from Johnson et al 2014). 20 marks

• An explanation as to how the company’s Human Resource Management (HRM) strategies should be adjusted / changed / developed if the internationalisation programme were to be pursued.
20 marks

• Conclusion 15 marks

• Recommendations 15 marks

Total 100 marks

The Board has advised you that you can assume that the sources of funds are available and that upon receipt of your report they may then commission a separate financial evaluation which need not be of concern to you.

In this assignment you must:
• Evaluate the features of the international business and the ways in which they affect corporate strategy.
• Demonstrate the nature of international cultural diversity and the implications for formulating corporate strategy.
• Analyse optimum methods of organising management, including control processes and communication systems, for international business.

I will attach a Case Study taken from Johnson et al, Exploring Strategy Texts and Cases, 2014. Whilst this contains information which you may consider relevant, it should not preclude you from your own further reading and undertaking your own research.

Strategy of International Business

Strategy of International Business
Order Description
Scenario

You have been appointed as advisor to the Board of Ryanair and have been asked to consider a proposal to expand through an internationalisation programme (based upon its successful “no-frills” positioning strategy/business model) by setting up a new strategic business unit (SBU) in Australia.

You are required to write a report to the Board setting out your recommendations and justifying them.

Your report should include:

• Introduction 10 marks

• Consideration of Porter’s National Double Diamond model (Porter M.E.1990) as adapted by Rugman and D’Cruz (1993,) between Ryanair’s home country (Ireland) and Australia. 20 marks

• An evaluation of the proposal by briefly applying the SAFe Criteria (Suitability, Acceptability and Feasibility criteria from Johnson et al 2014). 20 marks

• An explanation as to how the company’s Human Resource Management (HRM) strategies should be adjusted / changed / developed if the internationalisation programme were to be pursued.
20 marks

• Conclusion 15 marks

• Recommendations 15 marks

Total 100 marks

The Board has advised you that you can assume that the sources of funds are available and that upon receipt of your report they may then commission a separate financial evaluation which need not be of concern to you.

In this assignment you must:
• Evaluate the features of the international business and the ways in which they affect corporate strategy.
• Demonstrate the nature of international cultural diversity and the implications for formulating corporate strategy.
• Analyse optimum methods of organising management, including control processes and communication systems, for international business.

I will attach a Case Study taken from Johnson et al, Exploring Strategy Texts and Cases, 2014. Whilst this contains information which you may consider relevant, it should not preclude you from your own further reading and undertaking your own research.

Leading Knowledge Management for Organisational Learning

Leading Knowledge Management for Organisational Learning
Order Description
Length: i need 3000 words

Knowledge management analysis of your organisation
The requirement is that you write a case study of your local organisation1 in terms of knowledge management concepts. This case study must include a section that sets out future strategies to improve the knowledge management in your organisation. See the ‘Assessment criteria’ for more information. Many students ask people within their organisation for feedback or ideas, or other students to comment on their work. This is acceptable but please note that normal plagiarism rules apply so do not let your group write your assignment for you. You should cite academic literature and refer to knowledge management concepts and constructs that have been part of this topic.

Referencing
APA style is required for all School of Education topics. Please refer to ‘Referencing resources’ on the Student Learning Centre website for links to APA style of referencing.

Points to consider when writing an assignment
• Read the assignment details carefully and underline the key aspects that need to be addressed.
• Before submitting the assignment re-read the assignment details and check that you have in fact addressed all the points that have been mentioned.
• Use an academic style of writing including an introduction and conclusion. The introduction should outline the approach to be taken and the conclusion summarises the argument and leaves the reader with something to think about. Paragraphs should follow sequentially with the first sentence of each paragraph indicating the main theme of the paragraph to provide the reader with an idea of the author’s intention or to act as an introduction. Writing should be succinct and coherent, synthesising the reading material with personal interpretation.
• Ensure that you have met and not exceeded the word count.
• Use the academic terminology relevant to the topic.
• Avoid the use of the first person in an academic paper unless requested to in the assignment details.
• Format with double spacing with a 3 centimetre margin.
• If using abbreviations, use the expanded version in the first instance accompanied by the abbreviation and then just the abbreviation after that, for example, curriculum-based evaluation (CBE).
• Proof-read and edit work before submission.
• Provide a variety of sentence starters rather than repeating the same over.
• References should be on a separate page titled References.
• Check that all citations in the text are detailed in the reference section. Only references cited in the text should be detailed in the reference section. Page numbers must be cited when using a direct quotation.
APA referencing is required. See: http://www.flinders.edu.au/current-students/slc/study-guides/referencing.cfm
Penalties may apply if APA style conventions are not followed.
• Check that the quotations/citations used are relevant and serve to support the points/argument being made.
• Avoid overuse of quotations (no more than about 5% of word length). Quotations should be used sparingly.
• Academic integrity is taken very seriously. It is essential to cite your sources using APA style of referencing to avoid plagiarism. Please refer to the Student related policies and procedures manual

Leading Knowledge Management for Organisational Learning

Leading Knowledge Management for Organisational Learning
Order Description
Length: i need 3000 words

Knowledge management analysis of your organisation
The requirement is that you write a case study of your local organisation1 in terms of knowledge management concepts. This case study must include a section that sets out future strategies to improve the knowledge management in your organisation. See the ‘Assessment criteria’ for more information. Many students ask people within their organisation for feedback or ideas, or other students to comment on their work. This is acceptable but please note that normal plagiarism rules apply so do not let your group write your assignment for you. You should cite academic literature and refer to knowledge management concepts and constructs that have been part of this topic.

Referencing
APA style is required for all School of Education topics. Please refer to ‘Referencing resources’ on the Student Learning Centre website for links to APA style of referencing.

Points to consider when writing an assignment
• Read the assignment details carefully and underline the key aspects that need to be addressed.
• Before submitting the assignment re-read the assignment details and check that you have in fact addressed all the points that have been mentioned.
• Use an academic style of writing including an introduction and conclusion. The introduction should outline the approach to be taken and the conclusion summarises the argument and leaves the reader with something to think about. Paragraphs should follow sequentially with the first sentence of each paragraph indicating the main theme of the paragraph to provide the reader with an idea of the author’s intention or to act as an introduction. Writing should be succinct and coherent, synthesising the reading material with personal interpretation.
• Ensure that you have met and not exceeded the word count.
• Use the academic terminology relevant to the topic.
• Avoid the use of the first person in an academic paper unless requested to in the assignment details.
• Format with double spacing with a 3 centimetre margin.
• If using abbreviations, use the expanded version in the first instance accompanied by the abbreviation and then just the abbreviation after that, for example, curriculum-based evaluation (CBE).
• Proof-read and edit work before submission.
• Provide a variety of sentence starters rather than repeating the same over.
• References should be on a separate page titled References.
• Check that all citations in the text are detailed in the reference section. Only references cited in the text should be detailed in the reference section. Page numbers must be cited when using a direct quotation.
APA referencing is required. See: http://www.flinders.edu.au/current-students/slc/study-guides/referencing.cfm
Penalties may apply if APA style conventions are not followed.
• Check that the quotations/citations used are relevant and serve to support the points/argument being made.
• Avoid overuse of quotations (no more than about 5% of word length). Quotations should be used sparingly.
• Academic integrity is taken very seriously. It is essential to cite your sources using APA style of referencing to avoid plagiarism. Please refer to the Student related policies and procedures manual