In the “Becoming a Victim” resource section, you learned about the different the

In the “Becoming a Victim” resource section, you learned about the different theories of victimization and the various factors that might lead to a higher probability of becoming a victim. For this discussion, you will choose a victimization theory and describe that theory’s strengths and weaknesses.
In your initial post, identify the victimization theory you feel best explains how people and businesses increase their odds of becoming victims of crime. Using the “Becoming a Victim” resources as support, consider the questions below as you build a case for why that theory best explains how people and businesses increase their odds of becoming victims of crime.
What do you feel separates this theory from the others? What does it explain that the other theories do not?
No theory is perfect. What are the weaknesses or shortcomings of the theory you have chosen?
How does the theory you’ve chosen account for a business or corporation increasing their chances of becoming a victim?
For your two response posts, respond to one peer who chose the same theory that you did and a peer who chose a different theory. In your responses, consider the following questions:
Landon Harper
The lifestyle exposure theory postulates that individuals with certain demographic profiles are more susceptible to experience criminal victimization because their lifestyles expose them to riskier situations (Takahashi & James, 2019).
I believe the lifestyle exposure theory best explains how people and businesses increase their odds of becoming victims of crime. In context, the theory states that the more an individual operates or lives outside of their home, or a protected space, such as leisure for pleasure, working, shopping, or attending social events, they are more likely to become a victim of a crime (Takahashi & James, 2019).
Compared to other victimization theories, I believe the lifestyle exposure theory is most relatable to both individuals and businesses increasing their odds of becoming victims of crime. For example, the routine activity theory focuses on social interaction and patterns of criminal activity, whereas the lifestyle exposure theory focuses on susceptibility of becoming a victim due to exposures of everyday life (Takahashi & James, 2019). However, the shortcoming of the lifestyle exposure theory is that it does not account for patterns of victimization of older populations. The theory suggests that younger generations are more likely to incur victimization due to their social activity, but it doesn’t suggest the same risk for the elderly that are also socially active.
The lifestyle exposure theory is also more relatable to businesses and corporations. Similar to individuals, the theory also accounts for the exposures of daily commerce that may cause a business to incur victimization. If a business does not operate with a detailed plan of operation or deals with risky vendors, clients, or customers, they are increasing their exposure to crime.
References:
Takahashi, Y., & James, C. (2019). Victimology and Victim Assistance
Jeanette Tracer
The opportunity model is the victimization hypothesis that I believe best describes how people and businesses increase their chances of being victims throughout this discussion. The opportunity model builds on the lifestyle-exposure model as well as the routine activity model, identifying additional possible elements such exposure, guardianship, proximity of potential perpetrators, attractiveness of prospective targets, and features of specific acts (Takahashi & James, 2018). Nevertheless, it differs from other victimization theories in that it considers the attractiveness of the potential victim. The flaws in this concept are that, while it may be used to business, it cannot actually be applied to group victimization, such as arbitrary victimization at a concert, as the 2017 Las Vegas music festival shooting demonstrated. This theory explains how firms and corporations, like individuals, increase their risks of becoming victims in many of the same ways. Businesses and businesses can put themselves up as prospective targets for victimization by their exposure, which can capitalize on the appeal of the company’s success. Businesses can be without guardianship if they follow strict schedules, have no protection during closing time, or are understaffed. When looking at organizations or corporations, the offender can easily be exposed and located by the offender being a client, potential buyer, or even an individual who was possibly considered for a job.
References Takahashi, Y. & James, C. (2018). Victimology and Victim Assistance. [[VitalSource Bookshelf version]]. Retrieved from vbk://9781544350738
Is there something in their support of their chosen theory that you did not consider?
Are there other weaknesses or shortcomings of their theory that you feel should be considered?
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In the “Becoming a Victim” resource section, you learned about the different the
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